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Lana
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Additional concern
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art-library:

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Not stupid enough).
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throughsamslens:

untitled film still #21Cindy Sherman 1978
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facingfeminism:

Photoem #159 from the Facing Feminism: Feminists I Know project. (C) Facing Feminism Project
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fruitpolo:

Ghada Amer: Love Has No End February 16–October 19, 2008 Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, 4th Floor. Brooklyn Museum.

Always love Ghada Amer
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russianjails:

Untitled (Money can buy you love)
Barbara Kruger
Feminist Art
1985
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hayhoe-hayhoe:

It’s a joke, not a dick, don’t take it so hard. 2013. For this performance I wrote misogynist jokes I found online on bananas, peeled and ate them and discarded the skins around the gallery space. Performed at KINGS ARI as part of ORGI, a night of live, experimental and cross discipline art.
hayhoe-hayhoe:

It’s a joke, not a dick, don’t take it so hard. 2013. For this performance I wrote misogynist jokes I found online on bananas, peeled and ate them and discarded the skins around the gallery space. Performed at KINGS ARI as part of ORGI, a night of live, experimental and cross discipline art.
hayhoe-hayhoe:

It’s a joke, not a dick, don’t take it so hard. 2013. For this performance I wrote misogynist jokes I found online on bananas, peeled and ate them and discarded the skins around the gallery space. Performed at KINGS ARI as part of ORGI, a night of live, experimental and cross discipline art.
hayhoe-hayhoe:

It’s a joke, not a dick, don’t take it so hard. 2013. For this performance I wrote misogynist jokes I found online on bananas, peeled and ate them and discarded the skins around the gallery space. Performed at KINGS ARI as part of ORGI, a night of live, experimental and cross discipline art.
hayhoe-hayhoe:

It’s a joke, not a dick, don’t take it so hard. 2013. For this performance I wrote misogynist jokes I found online on bananas, peeled and ate them and discarded the skins around the gallery space. Performed at KINGS ARI as part of ORGI, a night of live, experimental and cross discipline art.
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minnapalmqvist:

A M A Z I N G and important art project by Sanja Ivekovic!
"Women’s House (Sunglasses)" 2002—-> Present
Text from Artfcity 
“Close-ups of models in fashion ads for sunglasses, the 2004 inkjet prints Women’s House (Sunglasses), line the third floor entry hall, each bearing a small red bar with the name of a women’s shelter and a first-person account of sexual violence or medical injustices. An abbreviated caption renders a woman at the mercy of her longtime doctor:

AGNIESZKA28, Polish, married, three childrenAll my pregnancies were supervised by the same woman doctor ”¦ For eight months in my last pregnancy she allowed me to believe that I was carrying a healthy child ”¦ It turned out that my child had severe developmental disabilities ”¦ Rozalka was born with no limbs.

Though a presentation of women’s tragedies as fashion spreads has little capacity to shock the contemporary viewer — there’s a sense throughout of how-many-times-do-I-have-to-tell-you-nicely-before-we-erect-another-giant-fucking-monument — Iveković claims in a 2009 interview that violence against women was, unfathomably, still a “hidden issue” in her country in the mid-nineties.
While educational posters speak to immediate social issues in 2000s Croatia, it’s decades-long commitment to women’s rights that speaks today at MoMA. The artist claims that she wanted to “reintroduce real women from our society … into public discourse.” Often, she does this by burying them: photos of real women are paired with similarly-posed glamour shots; magazine models are scratched, punctured, sliced, and torn; a grid of black-and-white photos are penned with phrases like “A life full of suffering” and “Bored of the good girl role.”
minnapalmqvist:

A M A Z I N G and important art project by Sanja Ivekovic!
"Women’s House (Sunglasses)" 2002—-> Present
Text from Artfcity 
“Close-ups of models in fashion ads for sunglasses, the 2004 inkjet prints Women’s House (Sunglasses), line the third floor entry hall, each bearing a small red bar with the name of a women’s shelter and a first-person account of sexual violence or medical injustices. An abbreviated caption renders a woman at the mercy of her longtime doctor:

AGNIESZKA28, Polish, married, three childrenAll my pregnancies were supervised by the same woman doctor ”¦ For eight months in my last pregnancy she allowed me to believe that I was carrying a healthy child ”¦ It turned out that my child had severe developmental disabilities ”¦ Rozalka was born with no limbs.

Though a presentation of women’s tragedies as fashion spreads has little capacity to shock the contemporary viewer — there’s a sense throughout of how-many-times-do-I-have-to-tell-you-nicely-before-we-erect-another-giant-fucking-monument — Iveković claims in a 2009 interview that violence against women was, unfathomably, still a “hidden issue” in her country in the mid-nineties.
While educational posters speak to immediate social issues in 2000s Croatia, it’s decades-long commitment to women’s rights that speaks today at MoMA. The artist claims that she wanted to “reintroduce real women from our society … into public discourse.” Often, she does this by burying them: photos of real women are paired with similarly-posed glamour shots; magazine models are scratched, punctured, sliced, and torn; a grid of black-and-white photos are penned with phrases like “A life full of suffering” and “Bored of the good girl role.”
minnapalmqvist:

A M A Z I N G and important art project by Sanja Ivekovic!
"Women’s House (Sunglasses)" 2002—-> Present
Text from Artfcity 
“Close-ups of models in fashion ads for sunglasses, the 2004 inkjet prints Women’s House (Sunglasses), line the third floor entry hall, each bearing a small red bar with the name of a women’s shelter and a first-person account of sexual violence or medical injustices. An abbreviated caption renders a woman at the mercy of her longtime doctor:

AGNIESZKA28, Polish, married, three childrenAll my pregnancies were supervised by the same woman doctor ”¦ For eight months in my last pregnancy she allowed me to believe that I was carrying a healthy child ”¦ It turned out that my child had severe developmental disabilities ”¦ Rozalka was born with no limbs.

Though a presentation of women’s tragedies as fashion spreads has little capacity to shock the contemporary viewer — there’s a sense throughout of how-many-times-do-I-have-to-tell-you-nicely-before-we-erect-another-giant-fucking-monument — Iveković claims in a 2009 interview that violence against women was, unfathomably, still a “hidden issue” in her country in the mid-nineties.
While educational posters speak to immediate social issues in 2000s Croatia, it’s decades-long commitment to women’s rights that speaks today at MoMA. The artist claims that she wanted to “reintroduce real women from our society … into public discourse.” Often, she does this by burying them: photos of real women are paired with similarly-posed glamour shots; magazine models are scratched, punctured, sliced, and torn; a grid of black-and-white photos are penned with phrases like “A life full of suffering” and “Bored of the good girl role.”
minnapalmqvist:

A M A Z I N G and important art project by Sanja Ivekovic!
"Women’s House (Sunglasses)" 2002—-> Present
Text from Artfcity 
“Close-ups of models in fashion ads for sunglasses, the 2004 inkjet prints Women’s House (Sunglasses), line the third floor entry hall, each bearing a small red bar with the name of a women’s shelter and a first-person account of sexual violence or medical injustices. An abbreviated caption renders a woman at the mercy of her longtime doctor:

AGNIESZKA28, Polish, married, three childrenAll my pregnancies were supervised by the same woman doctor ”¦ For eight months in my last pregnancy she allowed me to believe that I was carrying a healthy child ”¦ It turned out that my child had severe developmental disabilities ”¦ Rozalka was born with no limbs.

Though a presentation of women’s tragedies as fashion spreads has little capacity to shock the contemporary viewer — there’s a sense throughout of how-many-times-do-I-have-to-tell-you-nicely-before-we-erect-another-giant-fucking-monument — Iveković claims in a 2009 interview that violence against women was, unfathomably, still a “hidden issue” in her country in the mid-nineties.
While educational posters speak to immediate social issues in 2000s Croatia, it’s decades-long commitment to women’s rights that speaks today at MoMA. The artist claims that she wanted to “reintroduce real women from our society … into public discourse.” Often, she does this by burying them: photos of real women are paired with similarly-posed glamour shots; magazine models are scratched, punctured, sliced, and torn; a grid of black-and-white photos are penned with phrases like “A life full of suffering” and “Bored of the good girl role.”
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Reminds me of some things I have been drawing